South African society’s recognition of Catholic Bible scholars ‘very significant’: Priest

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“One of the reasons they ask Catholic Bible scholars to help them with deuterocanonical books is that Protestant Bibles don’t have deuterocanonical books. These are the books that have been rejected by Protestant denominations and accepted as canonical by Catholics, Orthodox churches and so on,” he explained.

Prof. Seheri continued, “We (Catholics) call them deuterocanonical books, which means second scriptures. They belong to the second canon. We believe these books are inspired. You find them in Catholic Bibles. But when you look at the Protestant Bibles, you find that some have completely rejected them.

“There are other Protestant Bibles where you find these books, but they are not classified as deuterocanonical but as apocryphal, which means their inspiration is questionable. They view them as uninspired, but important or can be used for instruction,” he added.

The clergyman from the Archdiocese of Johannesburg in South Africa acknowledged the importance of local Bible scholars, saying: “It is unfortunate that in Southern Africa we have a microscopic proportion of Bible scholars, it is why I always encourage seminarians to consider doing Bible studies. .”

With meetings held “every two months”, the Sesotho Bible Society review committee has “so far dealt with the book of Isaiah”, the father said. Seheri, and added, “I don’t know when we’ll finish; maybe two or three years because we meet every two months. It’s a very intense project. I found them already on the way, so to speak; this is my second meeting.”

“We meet for a week, Monday to Friday. So far we have dealt with the book of Isaiah; currently we are busy with the book of Ezekiel. We are reviewing or revising the 1989 Sesotho Bible. C It’s an exciting project, especially with scholars of other faiths,” he added.

In the October 27 interview, the Vicar for Vocations for the Archdiocese of Johannesburg also encouraged the people of God “to read the Bible, to read the word of God” because “it is important for our spiritual nourishment ; it is important for the life of the Church to fall in love with the Bible.

Sheila Pires is a veteran Mozambican radio and television journalist based in South Africa. She studied communications at the University of South Africa. She is passionate about writing about the works of the Church through Catholic journalism.

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